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Thread: Accuracy fixed.

  1. #61
    Bloodstained
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    Because if there is any chance that this blue loctite will become liquefied and run back into the receiver area I think that I might pass on using Loctite. But I still like the idea of using the tool to square up the face of the receiver and filling in the gap (if necessary) between the outside of the extension and inside of the receiver. These two ideas seem like they are relatively cheap and easy to help,or possibly solve accuracy problems. Or inaccuracy? (IMO)

  2. #62
    Bloodstained dreadpirate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWP View Post
    So now I'm curious, what temp does the barrel extension and chamber heat up to with an ambient temp of 95* shooting 10 shots at lets say in 20 seconds produce? Or, how many shots can be fired before the temp gets high enough to start to melt the blue loctite?
    Loctite 620 is rated to 450 deg F. I don't think semi-auto rates of fire would reach that temperature. On the other hand, if you did several mag dumps than perhaps you could hit that. I will not with my expected rate of fire.

  3. #63
    Chieftain NugginFutz's Avatar
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    There have literally been hundreds of loctited barrel extensions deployed, and I've yet to read where someone had an incident of blue incursion into the receiver. Here's something else for you to ponder: At 140F, it becomes too uncomfortable to hold your hand to the barrel. It is at or before this point where I've always set my rifles aside to cool while I gave another a turn on the bench. This is also the practice literally all my shooting partners follow and when they set theirs aside, as well.
    Last edited by NugginFutz; 07-16-2017 at 06:40 PM.
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  4. #64
    Bloodstained dreadpirate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWP View Post
    Because if there is any chance that this blue loctite will become liquefied and run back into the receiver area I think that I might pass on using Loctite. But I still like the idea of using the tool to square up the face of the receiver and filling in the gap (if necessary) between the outside of the extension and inside of the receiver. These two ideas seem like they are relatively cheap and easy to help,or possibly solve accuracy problems. Or inaccuracy? (IMO)
    Ok - Loctite or not - if you guys think your AR is heating up to 450 deg F, now you have to worry about annealing the aluminum upper. I really, really doubt it's going to get that hot.

  5. #65
    Bloodstained dreadpirate's Avatar
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    Don't get me wrong though - I think these are all great questions. At any rate, care should be taken when heating up Loctite on your aluminum upper.

  6. #66
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    Ok so for all intentional purposes Blue Loctite will liquefy at around 450 deg F. Given that number I plan on taking my MiniTemp laser gun with me to the range next time to do some testing on the temp of my different rifle barrels next to the receivers after firing some shots. Not only in different calibers but with some different powders, since I think that the difference in powders is a factor also. Maybe not that much but I'm still curious to see. Also because of the hand guard on my gas guns I'm not really able to feel the temp like I can on my bolt guns. We'll see what happens. I'm hoping after firing 20 shots with my 6.5 Grendel in around 30 - 40sec. that I'm nowhere near 450* F.

  7. #67
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    This may not be the most effective tool to measure with, but I think it will do. Any comments on this test are welcomed?
    Last edited by LWP; 07-16-2017 at 08:52 PM.

  8. #68
    Chieftain Klem's Avatar
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    I imagine glue will get soft as the breech heats up but as long as it is contained in the join it should (like water) be essentially incompressible. If incompressible then it is still should be providing support. Unlike grease, which is always viscous and so there's more opportunity for it to migrate out the tiny cracks and joins when hot or cold, when in use or being stored. I do notice when pulling off old barrels that there always seems to be less grease than when they first went on.

  9. #69
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    So this means that the Loctite is constantly changing form? I'm not a big fan of change, when something is constantly changing there is no consistency. And when there is no consistency things are not repeatable. I like my weapons and ammo to be repeatable for constant dependability.

  10. #70
    Chieftain Klem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWP View Post
    So this means that the Loctite is constantly changing form? I'm not a big fan of change, when something is constantly changing there is no consistency. And when there is no consistency things are not repeatable. I like my weapons and ammo to be repeatable for constant dependability.
    I agree, however like to keep an open mind on every new innovation. Occasionally innovations end up being fads so it pays to separate the confidence and wishful thinking from fact.

    What I am more interested in is the difference in precision between guns originally assembled with MILSPEC grease and then disassembled, cleaned and bedded with glue. There's not much that you can say with guns assembled from scratch with glue. It's all about the relative difference between glue and grease, all other things being equal.

  11. #71
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    Just thought I'd throw this in, purchased one of these yesterday. Updated my 20 something year old range finder. http://www.brownells.com/optics-moun...rod107245.aspx Just encase anybody was looking for one at a great price.

  12. #72
    Warrior Jakal's Avatar
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    I just lap and forego the loktite. Never really had any issues after lapping. I use Aeroshell grease on the barrel nut threads and torque the barrel nut tightening, looseing, tightening until I get my spec.
    ""Come taste my Shillelagh you goat-eatin bastard!""

  13. #73
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    I recently bought a leupold rx-650. Glad I kept the box, will be returning it. Just ordered the above range finder. 1760yrds!! Thank you LWP for heads up.

  14. #74
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    I think the annealing temp on 7075 (and 6061) is well above 450-degrees. The extension gets "warm" so measuring it would seem like good data to have. x2 on Klem's last post...as long as it sticks around (pun intended) in whatever form it's probably doing something.

    I'm curious now...next time we get one of the brothers FA dealer samples out and dump a few Magpul 60's through it I'll infared a couple places and post back.

  15. #75
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    No problem, hope they work well. They should because it's definitely an up grade from my old 800yd Simmons. Good brand and quality plus the WiFi capability and later maybe I'll add the wind meter up grade. We'll see!

  16. #76
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    The more info on the Temp test the better, Thanks

  17. #77
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    I think that if I were to discover an excessive amount of gap between the outside of the extension and inside of the receiver I'll try shimming it with a very thin piece of metal. One option may even be to bond the sleeve to the extension, but I would not think that there's enough space for epoxy too. I guess it would depend on the gap that one would have to start with.

  18. #78
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    I suppose that I could bed it in the same manner that I do with my bolt action receivers. Using shoe polish and Marine-Tex,applying the Marine-Tex to the outside of the extension and polish to the inside of the receiver.
    Last edited by LWP; 07-17-2017 at 08:55 PM.

  19. #79
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    I would fore go the Marine Tex as it shrinks and take a look at Devcon 10110 Plastic Steel Putty, sets up hard and will not shrink. Applying the release properly is critical though if you ever wanted to take it apart. I would almost be tempted in applying release to both the barrel ext and inside the receiver and then coat the inside of the receiver as the excess would be pushed out into the receiver in stead of it being piled up on the shoulder of the extension and potentially the threads.

    Several places do sell some rather thin shim stock, would think that would be a good way to go if you don't tear it up sliding in the barrel.

  20. #80
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    Using this method only because I want the epoxy to stick to the outside of the extension but not to the inside of the receiver. I think having the epoxy adhere to the extension would make for the perfect gap filler. And by leaving the very thin layer of shoe polish inside the receiver you would be able to remove the two later if desired. Extreme caution and patience would be advised in using this method. Also applying a thin layer of shoe polish to the face of the receiver and the threads on the outside of the receiver would be advised as a precaution so as not to have the epoxy stick to those areas. And when inserting the extension and barrel into the receiver wiping off the excess epoxy that would be squeezed out from between the face of the receiver and the face of the extension ring. I would do this method of installation with the receivers face in a vice pointing downward. After installing the barrel and wiping all excess epoxy away and applying some shoe polish to the threads of the outside receiver threads again and the treads of the inside of the barrel nut, tighten the two together. Not to torque specs yet because you may want to inspect the epoxy after it cures. By this I mean unscrewing the barrel nut to see if any epoxy is inside the barrel nut treads or on the outside of the receivers treads. If so it should be fairly easy to remove with a pick and brush or similar tools. That way after cleaning and greasing up the treads with Anti-sez, or some other grease,you can install and torque the barrel nut with out any obstructions between them. This might just work? Any comments welcome?

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