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Thread: Eye sight and Sight picture for us older folks

  1. #1
    Warrior
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    Eye sight and Sight picture for us older folks

    I am finding as I get older that my vision is getting a little worse that it is harder to get good focus on the sights (iron) and the target. Are there any tricks or glasses (of course other than my current bifocals) that might help? My scopes I can adjust so most of this problem is with open sights.

    Thanks
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  2. #2
    Warrior Michael's Avatar
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    Have you tried any of the sight paints? I have had good luck with BrightSights http://www.brightsights.com/products.shtml.

  3. #3
    Chieftain Drifter's Avatar
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    I haven't used the SR Microsight, but it looks interesting and might be an option for you:

    http://www.auburnscouts.com/stalling...microsight.htm
    Drifter

  4. #4
    davidj
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    Do you shoot with both eyes open? If so try closing the non sighting eye.

    take a look at this too.

    http://www.eabco.com/css_sts2.html
    Last edited by davidj; 01-28-2013 at 01:57 AM.

  5. #5
    LRRPF52
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    Another product you can try is the H-Viz Fiber-Optic Front Sight. I have one on my Model 727 Clone, with the red tube inserted.

    http://www.brownells.com/rifle-parts...2.aspx?ttver=2


  6. #6
    stokesrj
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    What you really need is crisp focus on the front sight, Bob Jones makes lenses that go in the A2 rear sight hood. In general most older folks need either a .5 of .75 diopter rear lens to allow sharp focus on the front sight with a relaxed eye muscle. You will also need a small rear aperture, .038, .040 or .042, the smaller the longer the focal length.
    http://www.bjonessights.com/AR15.html

    The only proper color for a front sight to give you the greatest definition and accuracy is flat black. Sure the optical fiber and paint can make the front sight stand out, but you will be hard pressed to produce 1.5 MOA accuracy with them. A properly smoked front sight can produce .5 MOA accuracy provided the rifle and ammo are up to it. A carbide smoker is handy to keep your front sight non reflective, I use the RayVin Super Smoker.
    You can get a Super Smoker from several places, I like White Oak Armament http://www.whiteoakarmament.com/xcar...cat=256&page=5
    If you decide to get one, here is a little video that helps you understand how to use it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXF0u8OrLdU
    I have owned and used the micro sight, it is really neat and does allow you to see the front sight and target both in focus at the same time. But I found it to be unreliable under some light conditions and alignment is critical. Most people I know that use them have problems with wandering zero's but for some it works really well.
    I personally know Bob Jones of Bjones sights, John Holliger of White Oak Armament, and Ray Brandes the inventor of the Ray Vin Super smoker, in fact he and I shared a condo at Camp Perry for the National matches this year. These are all things I used to win my distinguished rifleman badge so I know they work.
    There are also shooting glasses made specifically for this purpose I own three different ones, the Bjones, Knobloch, and DeCott but I prefer the lens mounted in the hood. I'll be 59 years old this year and can still shoot half minute groups with my service rifle using the A2 metallic sights.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Chieftain montana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stokesrj View Post
    What you really need is crisp focus on the front sight, Bob Jones makes lenses that go in the A2 rear sight hood. In general most older folks need either a .5 of .75 diopter rear lens to allow sharp focus on the front sight with a relaxed eye muscle. You will also need a small rear aperture, .038, .040 or .042, the smaller the longer the focal length.
    http://www.bjonessights.com/AR15.html

    The only proper color for a front sight to give you the greatest definition and accuracy is flat black. Sure the optical fiber and paint can make the front sight stand out, but you will be hard pressed to produce 1.5 MOA accuracy with them. A properly smoked front sight can produce .5 MOA accuracy provided the rifle and ammo are up to it. A carbide smoker is handy to keep your front sight non reflective, I use the RayVin Super Smoker.
    You can get a Super Smoker from several places, I like White Oak Armament http://www.whiteoakarmament.com/xcar...cat=256&page=5
    If you decide to get one, here is a little video that helps you understand how to use it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXF0u8OrLdU
    I have owned and used the micro sight, it is really neat and does allow you to see the front sight and target both in focus at the same time. But I found it to be unreliable under some light conditions and alignment is critical. Most people I know that use them have problems with wandering zero's but for some it works really well.
    I personally know Bob Jones of Bjones sights, John Holliger of White Oak Armament, and Ray Brandes the inventor of the Ray Vin Super smoker, in fact he and I shared a condo at Camp Perry for the National matches this year. These are all things I used to win my distinguished rifleman badge so I know they work.
    There are also shooting glasses made specifically for this purpose I own three different ones, the Bjones, Knobloch, and DeCott but I prefer the lens mounted in the hood. I'll be 59 years old this year and can still shoot half minute groups with my service rifle using the A2 metallic sights.

    Bob
    stokesrj, I'm impressed. I'm 53 and gave up open sights years ago. It's only scopes and aim point for me now. I'll have to look into shooting glasses after reading your thread.

  8. #8
    Warrior
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    Great info, some good reading for tonight. THANKS
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  9. #9
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    Thanks for that great info Bob. I like the idea of the glasses, I'll check that out.

    Eric
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by montana View Post
    stokesrj, I'm impressed. I'm 53 and gave up open sights years ago. It's only scopes and aim point for me now. I'll have to look into shooting glasses after reading your thread.
    Montana:

    There are a couple of problems with shooting glasses. So, before you spend a couple hundred dollars on a prescription pair, or even a pair with some sort of magnification, let me list a few issues you will have.

    First, the really good ones use a monocular lens for your shooting eye and a blinder for your non shooting eye. These are the pricy ones costing a couple hundred for the frames. They are designed for competitive bullseye shooters and are as useless as tits on a bull for anything other than that sport. They are fully adjustable and are easily broken.

    Second, they will fog up on you big time if you try to use them in cold / wet conditions.

    Third, the ones that adjust do so for one position. If you have them adjusted for standing (for example) and you want to shoot seated, kneeling, or prone, you must adjust them for those specific positions.

    Forth, if you adjust these things properly and shift your head position, even slightly, you are in big trouble. They are utterly unforgiving if your position shifts by more than an inch or so.

    Let me recommend you get fitted for contacts. If you get fitted properly, they will be OK but not perfect. Lasik is probably your best bet.

    Or, you can use some sort of adjustable aperture sights but those are basically only good for round black circles on white paper.

    I think if you want to go out and blast with those old military bolt rifles with those skinny front sight posts, some decent contact lenses will be way more user friendly than shooting glasses.

    LR1955

  11. #11
    Moderator bwaites's Avatar
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    Glasses are a HUGE compromise. They are designed with a single true focal objective, to make you see as well as possible through the center of the lens. But you only look through that center with your head in a certain position, so any other position is less than perfect, and sometimes terrible.

    I shoot with a guy who is in the top twenty 3 gun shooters in the country, and he has gone through LOTS of different options trying to find the glasses that work best for that sport, where you are standing, kneeling, prone, etc. He hasn't found anything but a compromise so far.

    The glasses I really like for Steel Challenge suck for prone.

    You may end up with a pair for each position, adjusted for that position only.
    ”You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  12. #12
    Chieftain montana's Avatar
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    Thanks LR1955, I keep hoping for some youth drug or a miracle cure. I have no problem with scopes and aim points for the type of shooting I do, but I still miss shooting through my peep sight's like I could in my youth. I don't shoot bulls eye and didn't realize they were so expensive and mission specific. Thanks for the heads up, it is appreciated.

  13. #13
    stokesrj
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    I don't really see eye to eye with these guys, pun intended. I shoot deer, hogs, and such with metallic sights frequently so don't agree they are for round bulls eyes only. I use a .25 diopter rear lens most often but I also have Decott high wide glasses that I use some times also with my distance vision prescription in the center and .25 diopter in the upper half of the right lens for use with metallic sights. To prevent fogging simply rub a tin layer of dish soap on the lens and then buff to a polish, fogging is a thing of the past.

    I don't have anything against red dots or scopes, I use both but I can shoot more accurately with metallic sight than a red dot, and equal to a scope in most situations. The exception is deer in woods screened by brush, I want a scope then, but in open terrain I've taken multiple deer at greater than 300 yards with irons.
    If you like them don't let someone talk you out of it.
    Bob

  14. #14
    Chieftain montana's Avatar
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    stokesrj I never knock anything until I try it myself. I don't think for my hunting needs I would use them but I would like to shoot open sight for fun at my range and will look into them. I'm still amazed people like you can shoot so well with open sights at such long range and appreciate your suggestions as others have given. This is a great forum.

  15. #15
    Nukes
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    Quote Originally Posted by LR1955 View Post
    ...some decent contact lenses will be way more user friendly than shooting glasses.

    LR1955
    Since contact lenses float and shift, position changes are problematic, especially for those who need astigmatic correction.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nukes View Post
    Since contact lenses float and shift, position changes are problematic, especially for those who need astigmatic correction.
    Nukes:

    I know because I have astigmatism and use contacts when I compete in High Power. It is not necessarily problematic. I worked with my doctor and found a brand that rarely shifted and if they did, were easily corrected with a blink of the eye.. It took a number of tries but it can be done. Periodically I use them in winter biathlon when my eyes are giving me more trouble than normal. Guess what? They work in all weather conditions and won't fog up.

    Stokes uses the lens inserts for the rear (hooded) sight on service rifles (M-16 / M-14). The ones for the AR's screw in so the worse that can happen is they unscrew. If they rotate (unscrew), your zero will change. They will also fog up in adverse conditions. If it is raining, they will get water on them eventually. They are good for High Power in normal High Power weather conditions. They are as 'problematic' as any other optical device once they are exposed to anything other than sunshine and dry. I think they are a better bet than contacts for High Power when using a service rifle that has a hooded rear sight but only if the weather is clear.

    And your solution or recommendation is?

    LR1955

  17. #17
    Warrior
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    I am 65 and can shoot open barrel sights with plain lenses shooting glasses but, I have a piece of tape with a tiny hole I look through .It really clears up the sights .We shoot WW 2 military rifles out to 500 meters .Its slow shooting but it works . For my 03A3 and Garand and 1917 which have a peep hole at the rear ,I use a +1 power lenses which clears the blade to very sharp . Every ones eyes are different so experimenting and some compromise is needed .Almost every one I shoot with wears corrective lenses all the time and if I look through there scope or spotting scope I have to readjust for my eyes .Either my eyes are more normal than there's or I am the odd ball but I have won many matches and even recently .Arnie

  18. #18
    Bloodstained
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    I bought a pair of cheap +.75 reading glasses that I am going to try next time I'm at the range just to see if they help with iron sights before I try anything more costly.. testing at home I can definitely see the front post clearly and 100+yds clearly.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onewolf View Post
    I bought a pair of cheap +.75 reading glasses that I am going to try next time I'm at the range just to see if they help with iron sights before I try anything more costly.. testing at home I can definitely see the front post clearly and 100+yds clearly.
    Don't short change cheapo fifteen dollar reading glasses. They work providing you don't have to contort yourself into a position where the classes slip or where they are not sitting high enough on the bridge of the nose -- like when in the prone for example.

    The key to using glasses is to get frames that adjust so your eyes are looking through the center of the glass in the position you are using. And that they don't move when shooting.

    LR1955

  20. #20
    Bloodstained grayfox's Avatar
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    I realize this is an old thread, but it seems a good place for me to chip in from my experience. I was having trouble seeing the target clearly thru the scope, but didn't realize it was b/c of cataracts until my doc clued me in. A fantastic ophthalmologist by the way!!!

    When the time comes that you need to do cataract surgery here's what I decided: 1. Unless you have that burning desire for the toric lenses (supposed to handle all near, mid and far-range sight), go for the mono focus with that focus being distance vision. It'll make sense in a moment.
    2. Find a Dr that does airline pilots b/c they understand seeing close in for your "cockpit" yet 20/20 downrange.
    3. Get the astigatism shaved down during the surgery, they can do that I found out.
    4. As for that mono-vision, do one eye a little "closer-in vision" than the other... just a tad - that's what she (my Dr) does for the pilot guys.
    5. Then for glasses, the $15 reading ones like 55 said, but wait!!!! there's also polarized and shooting style glasses (maybe, what? $18 or $20) that are clear up above (for the downrange seeing) - or tinted - and a small "bifocal" insert down low for your up close/reading etc sight (Now THIS was a super find, on Amazon.). Sometimes called "fishing sunglasses."
    And taking out the cataracts by the way, turned my yellow-fuzzy sight super clear, so that's what was hurting my scope-vision/focus in the first place.

    This is a super setup now!!! of course talk w/ your Doc but this is just a run-down so you have an account to start your own discussions with.

    Bottom line, cataracts as far as shooting goes, are nothing to be afraid of.

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